"Kate Greenstreet’s The End of Something is a mesmerizing rumination on flux and trust, wisdom and the divided self." Mary Jo Bang Vallum: Contemporary Poetry "2017: Year in Review"

 

"I believe Greenstreet’s poems to be exactly what is often said about successful poems: that they are the distillations of entire worlds which become available in their entirety again to discerning (empathetic) readers." Eileen Tabios Galatea Resurrects


"The poems adjust themselves so that what is questioned can be gleaned in scraps; that which dangles in a room long after we've left it; the sound of the unsaid; the weight of the unheard . . . but they are also grounded in images, images like the doll on the cover. In life, we use dolls to interact with, to accompany the idea of play, to expand our worlds, but they are also put away, left to be, with their eyes open when no one is around, or when everyone else is sleeping." Tyler Flynn Dorholt 4 Square Review

 

"Giorgio Agamben [in The Fire and the Tale] explores the internal resistance that he says characterizes art works. In The End of Something by Kate Greenstreet, every line/sentence is both complete and incomplete. I have never read anything quite like it. It’s a good example of the kind of resistance Agamben was talking about." Rae Armantrout The Paris Review "Our Contributor's Favorite Books of 2017"

"What a marvelous book . . . writ in a language we know but have never used this way." Todd Walton The Mendocino Humanist

 

"Greenstreet’s use of fragmentation explores the possibilities that can come from endings. It’s a book that asks the reader to trust it, but as in all of her work, Greenstreet creates a strong sense of trust from the very beginning." Adam Clay Kenyon Review’s Holiday Reading Recommendations

 

 

BACK TO TOP

< The End of Something  REVIEWS

"Kate Greenstreet’s The End of Something is a mesmerizing rumination on flux and trust, wisdom and the divided self." Mary Jo Bang Vallum: Contemporary Poetry "2017: Year in Review"

 

"Giorgio Agamben [in The Fire and the Tale] explores the internal resistance that he says characterizes art works. In The End of Something by Kate Greenstreet, every line/sentence is both complete and incomplete. I have never read anything quite like it. It’s a good example of the kind of resistance Agamben was talking about." Rae Armantrout The Paris Review "Our Contributor's Favorite Books of 2017"

 

"I believe Greenstreet’s poems to be exactly what is often said about successful poems: that they are the distillations of entire worlds which become available in their entirety again to discerning (empathetic) readers." Eileen Tabios Galatea Resurrects

 

 "What a marvelous book . . . writ in a language we know but have never used this way." Todd Walton The Mendocino Humanist


"The poems adjust themselves so that what is questioned can be gleaned in scraps; that which dangles in a room long after we've left it; the sound of the unsaid; the weight of the unheard . . . but they are also grounded in images, images like the doll on the cover. In life, we use dolls to interact with, to accompany the idea of play, to expand our worlds, but they are also put away, left to be, with their eyes open when no one is around, or when everyone else is sleeping." Tyler Flynn Dorholt
4 Square Review

 

"Greenstreet’s use of fragmentation explores the possibilities that can come from endings. It’s a book that asks the reader to trust it, but as in all of her work, Greenstreet creates a strong sense of trust from the very beginning." Adam Clay Kenyon Review’s Holiday Reading Recommendations

 

 

BACK TO TOP